Wednesday, 11 March 2009

Spotting QR tags in the real world

One of the prototypes made for dev8D has been adapted so it can 'splash a big QR code onto the screen' so people can conferences can take a shot of it and click straight through to the URL - no typing.  Super cool!

I'm excited by Semapedia, a project "which uses QR Code nodes to connect Wikipedia articles with their relevant place in physical space". You can browse locations that have been tagged on a map or on Flickr. I get excited by things like this because it makes 'outside the walls of the museum' projects seem much more feasible.

The ZKM (Centre for Art and Media, Karlsruhe) are exploring mobile tagging for their 20th anniversay: "[w]ith this new tag solution, you can communicate with the museum and use it as a platform also outside of opening hours, i.e., not bound to a certain time, and without being physically present in the museum, i.e., not bound to a certain place." The site is in German so it's difficult to work out exactly what you get online. Thanks to Jennifer Trant for the tip-off.

Two notes on QR tags out in the wild - Seb's recent post linked to 'a guerilla art installation at [Melbourne's] Federation Square' which is ace on so many levels.  I love their ethos.

The image is a photo I took today - a band have put up a QR tag outside a London tube station.  It takes you to a page that links to a downloadable track and their iTunes and MySpace pages.

Tragically, I've even started using QR codes in the office - I often use my phone to test sites outside our network, and I've printed out a sheet of QR codes for sites I check often, to save typing in URLs on my phone keyboard.

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