Monday, 11 January 2010

What do you mean by 'wireframe'?

This post on 'The future of wireframes?' chimed a few bells, not only because I'm revising for a Requirements Engineering exam but because I've been in the start-up phase for projects of all sizes lately and have been thinking hard about the best way to understand and communicate requirements. In doing so, I've realised that 'wireframes' has become one of those terms that mean different things to different people - and that of course, it's an entirely new term to people who haven't worked on a design phase of a digital project before. This summed up past and current definitions neatly:

For many years the primary role of wireframes was to specify software. We now use wireframes to investigate and explore how people will interact with a site. Using a ‘just enough’ approach, we often create a series of simple interactive prototypes to try out a variety of approaches to solving a problem. These prototypes can be made in HTML or they can be as simple as a series of Keynote slide for someone to click through.

This is a very different approach to wireframing. Rather than simply documenting where a link goes, the goal is to model and start experiencing what moving around a site feels like as quickly as possible. The prototype can then be tested and the results used to iteratively improve the end solution.

Of course, sites still need to be specified, but wireframes aren’t always the right tool for doing this.

Here's a list of wireframe and prototype tools - do you have any favourites?

A rare post from me - I've been completely caught up in work and my MSc for the past few months. Normal service will be resumed soon - I've still got to report on UKMW09 and a trip to Oslo to give a lecture on social media and museums, libraries and archives.

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