Thursday, 6 October 2011

Notes from EuropeanaTech 2011

Some very scrappy notes from the EuropeanaTech conference held in Vienna this week as I prepare a short talk for the Open data in cultural heritage (LODLAM-London) event tonight... For a different perspective there's an overview post at EuropeanaTech – är det här framtidens kulturarv? and I'll link to any others I find.  I've also put up some photos of ten questions attendees asked about Europeana, with written answers from the break-out exercise.  I'll tidy up and post my keynote notes in a few days, and I'll probably summarise things a bit more then.

Max Kaiser: Europeana is like a cruise ship with limited room to move, hackathons inject Europeana with a bit more agility... Build real stuff for real people with real business requirements - different to building prototypes and proofs of concept - requires different project culture.

Bill Thompson: pulling the analogue past into the digital future... We don't live in a digital world and never will - the physical world is not going to vanish. We'll remain embodied minds; will have co-existing analogue and digital worlds.Digital technologies shaping the possibilities we decide to embrace. ... Can't have a paradigm shift in humanities because no basic set of beliefs to argue with... But maybe the shift to digital is so fundamental that it could be called a paradigm shift. ... Even if you don't engage online, you'll still live in a world shaped by the digital.  Those who are online will come to define the norms. ... Revolutionary vanguard in our midst - hope lies with the programmers, the coders - the only weapon that matters is running code. Have to build on technologies that are open, only way to build diverse online culture that allows all voices to be heard. ... Means open data in a usable form - properly formulated so can be interpreted by anyone or any program that wants it; integrate them into the broader cultural space. Otherwise just disconnected islands.

Two good reasons to endorse open linked data. We're the first generation that's capable of doing this - have the tools, network, storage, processes. Within our power to digitise everything and make it findable. We may also be the only generation that wants to do it - later generations will not value things that aren't visible on the screen in the same way - they'll forget the importance of the non-digital. So we'd better get on with it, and do it properly. LOD is a foundation that allows us to build in the future.

Panel discussion...

Qu: how does open theme fit with orgs with budget cuts and need to make more money?
BT: when need to make money from assets, openness is a real challenge. There are ways of making assets available to people that are unlikely to have commercial impact but could raise awareness e.g. low-res for public access, high-res for commercial use [a model adopted by many UK museums].

Jill Cousins: there's a reputational need to put decent resolution images online to counter poor quality versions online.
Max: be clever - don't make an exclusive contract with digitisation partners - make sure you can also give free access to it.

Jill Cousins: User always been central to Europeana though got slightly lost along the way as busy getting data.  ...  Big stumbling block - licenses. Not just commercial reasons, also about reputational risk, loss of future earnings, fear of giving away something that's valuable in future. Without CC licence, can't publish as linked open data. Without it, commercial providers like INA can't take the API. Can't use blogs that have advertising on them. Couldn't put it on Wikipedia. Or ArtFinder.  ...  New [UK?] Renaissance report - metadata related to the digitised objects by cultural heritage orgs should be widely and freely available for re-use.

Workshops with content holders: Risks - loss of quality, loss of control, attribution, brand value, potential income ('phantom income'), unwanted spillover effects - misuse/juxtaposition of data. Rwards: increasing relevance, increasing channels to end users, data enrichment, brand value, specific funding opportunties, discoverability, new customers, public mission, building expertise, desired spillover effects. ... You are reliant on user doing the right thing with attribution....

Main risks: unwanted spillover effects, loss of attribution, loss of potential income. Main rewards: new customers, increasing relevance, public mission. But the risks diminshed as the rewards gain more prominence - overall outweighed the risks.  But address those 3 areas of risk.

What next? Operationalise some of the applications developed.  Yellow Kitchen Maid paper on the business of open data. Working together on difficulties faced by institutions and licensing open data.

[notes from day 2 to follow!]

Ten questions about Europeana...
10 questions (and one general question)
The general question was, what can the community building with domain experts, developers and researchers/R&D/innovation work package in Europeana 2.0 do?  (Something like that anyway, it was all a bit confusing by that point)

You had to pick a question and go into a group to try and answer it - I've uploaded photos of the answer sheets.
1 Open source - if Europeana using open source software and is open software, should it also become a community-driven development project?
2 Open source - are doubts about whether OSS provides quality services justified? What should be done to ensure quality?
3 Aggregation and metadata quality - what will be the role of aggregators, and what is role of Europeana in LOD future?
4 What can Europeana do which search engines can't that justifies the extra effort of creating and managing structured metadata?
5 Is EDM [Europeana Data Model] still too complicated? If yes, what to simplify.
6 What is the actual value of semantic contexualisation, and could that not be produced by search engines?
7 enhance experience of exploring, discovering [see photo - it was too long to type in time!]
8 How important is multilingual access for discovery in Europeana? Which elements are the most important?
9 Can Europeana drive end-user engagement on the distributed sites and services of contributing archives?
10 How can we benefit from existing (local, international) communities in enriching the user experience on Europeana?

No comments:

Post a Comment